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  • Larch Street

    Larch Street is a small street that runs from 708 North 2nd Street east to North 7th Street, situated between State and Vine Streets. Larch Street first appears in city directories in 1878. An earlier Larch Street, listed in the 1863 city directory and located elsewhere, had either been renamed or no longer existed by…

  • Kolo Street

    Kolo Street is a one-block street that runs south from opposite 1131 Sheridan Street, ending at Van Hook Street. There are three brick twin homes on Kolo Street, resulting in six addresses.

  • Attorney General Platkin Announces Racketeering Charges Against Six Defendants in Criminal Enterprise Led by George Norcross

    Conspiracy Spanning Twelve Years Resulted in the Enterprise’s Acquisition of Camden Waterfront Property and Property Rights for Itself and Others through Unlawful Means For Immediate Release: June 17, 2024 Office of the Attorney General– Matthew J. Platkin, Attorney GeneralOffice of Public Integrity and Accountability– Drew Skinner, Executive Director For Further Information: Media Inquiries-Sharon [email protected] TRENTON — Attorney General…

  • Jane Street

    Jane Street

    Jane Street, occasionally known as Jayne Street, was a small, street in Camden, NJ, running south for one block from 1062 Line Street to Pine Street. Located just east of Haddon Avenue, it was a notable part of the city’s layout in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. According to the 1890-1891 Camden City…

  • Edwin A. Stevens School

    Edwin A. Stevens School

    430 South 4th Street The two Stevens brothers, Robert L. and Edwin A. Stevens, owned a large tract of land south of the railroad, now Mickle Boulevard, which they divided into building lots around 1840. Stevens Street, located on their land, bears their name. Edwin A. Stevens, who lived in Hoboken, NJ, donated the lot…

  • Alfred Cramer Elementary School

    Alfred Cramer Elementary School

    2800 Mickle Street, Camden, NJ In 1913, the Eastside Elementary School was built in the 2800 block of Mickle Street during the administration of Mayor Charles H. Ellis. At this time, Camden’s longtime Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James E. Bryan, oversaw the construction of many new schools in Camden. As East Camden’s population grew and…

  • William J. Sewell School

    William J. Sewell School

    700 North Seventh Street Northeast Corner of North 7th & Vine Streets The William Joyce Sewell School was built as an outcome of a July 1902 decision of the Camden Board of Education that a new school, designed by architect Arnold H. Moses, be built on the northeast corner of North 7th and Vine Streets,…

  • Central School

    Central School

    Central School’s roots trace back to Camden’s earliest days of public education, named for its location in the Middle Ward, one of Camden’s original three wards before the 1871 Charter. In 1877, Camden’s Board of Education decided to replace the old school at South 4th Street and Hartman Street (now Clinton Street) with a new…

  • Girard Place

    Girard Place

    Girard Place was a small, dead-end street that extended east from 916 St. John Street in Camden. First appearing in the Camden City Directories in 1890, Girard Place initially featured eleven homes. The street was later extended to connect with Newton Avenue after the demolition of the frame dwellings at 915 Newton Avenue. By 1947,…

  • Gold Street

    Gold Street was a small, somewhat secluded street situated between South 8th Street and Silver Street, just south of Line Street in Camden. Accessible only via Silver Street by wagon or automobile, Gold Street and its neighboring Silver Street first appear in the historical record with residences listed in the 1888 Camden City Directory. However,…

  • Milton Street

    Milton Street

    Byron Street, Burns Street, and Milton Street in North Camden have an intertwined history that traces back to the late 19th century. According to the 1890-1891 directory, only a few homes existed on Milton Street, indicating that development started at the ends of Byron Street and gradually filled in. Byron Street appears to have been…

  • Riley Street

    Riley Street ran south from 419 Washington Street for one block to Berkley Street. It featured ten two-story brick rowhouses, five on each side, numbered 431 to 440. The lot of the E. A. Stevens School backed against the houses on the east side of Riley Street. Camden City Directories list residents on Riley Street…

  • Simmons Court

    Simmons Court is one of Camden’s “lost streets.” Prior to 1863, Henry Simmons, described in the Camden City Directories of that year as “colored” and working as a seaman, acquired a parcel of land comprising the three lots that would become 240, 242, and 244 Division Street. He was likely the son of Samuel and…

  • Grant Street

    Grant Street was named after Ulysses S. Grant, the Civil War hero and 18th President of the United States.

  • A Child’s Life on Grant Street: Memories of Camden

    It all begins in a little row house (they call them townhouses now) on Grant Street in Camden NJ. I remember my mother telling me once that she and my father paid $3,000 for that house somewhere around 1952, when they married. I slept in the same bed with my older sister Chris, who was…