Author: Camden NJ History

  • Edwin A. Stevens School

    Edwin A. Stevens School

    430 South 4th Street The two Stevens brothers, Robert L. and Edwin A. Stevens, owned a large tract of land south of the railroad, now Mickle Boulevard, which they divided into building lots around 1840. Stevens Street, located on their land, bears their name. Edwin A. Stevens, who lived in Hoboken, NJ, donated the lot…

  • Alfred Cramer Elementary School

    Alfred Cramer Elementary School

    2800 Mickle Street, Camden, NJ In 1913, the Eastside Elementary School was built in the 2800 block of Mickle Street during the administration of Mayor Charles H. Ellis. At this time, Camden’s longtime Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James E. Bryan, oversaw the construction of many new schools in Camden. As East Camden’s population grew and…

  • William J. Sewell School

    William J. Sewell School

    700 North Seventh Street Northeast Corner of North 7th & Vine Streets The William Joyce Sewell School was built as an outcome of a July 1902 decision of the Camden Board of Education that a new school, designed by architect Arnold H. Moses, be built on the northeast corner of North 7th and Vine Streets,…

  • Central School

    Central School

    Central School’s roots trace back to Camden’s earliest days of public education, named for its location in the Middle Ward, one of Camden’s original three wards before the 1871 Charter. In 1877, Camden’s Board of Education decided to replace the old school at South 4th Street and Hartman Street (now Clinton Street) with a new…

  • Girard Place

    Girard Place

    Girard Place was a small, dead-end street that extended east from 916 St. John Street in Camden. First appearing in the Camden City Directories in 1890, Girard Place initially featured eleven homes. The street was later extended to connect with Newton Avenue after the demolition of the frame dwellings at 915 Newton Avenue. By 1947,…

  • Gold Street

    Gold Street was a small, somewhat secluded street situated between South 8th Street and Silver Street, just south of Line Street in Camden. Accessible only via Silver Street by wagon or automobile, Gold Street and its neighboring Silver Street first appear in the historical record with residences listed in the 1888 Camden City Directory. However,…

  • Milton Street

    Milton Street

    Byron Street, Burns Street, and Milton Street in North Camden have an intertwined history that traces back to the late 19th century. According to the 1890-1891 directory, only a few homes existed on Milton Street, indicating that development started at the ends of Byron Street and gradually filled in. Byron Street appears to have been…

  • Riley Street

    Riley Street ran south from 419 Washington Street for one block to Berkley Street. It featured ten two-story brick rowhouses, five on each side, numbered 431 to 440. The lot of the E. A. Stevens School backed against the houses on the east side of Riley Street. Camden City Directories list residents on Riley Street…

  • Simmons Court

    Simmons Court is one of Camden’s “lost streets.” Prior to 1863, Henry Simmons, described in the Camden City Directories of that year as “colored” and working as a seaman, acquired a parcel of land comprising the three lots that would become 240, 242, and 244 Division Street. He was likely the son of Samuel and…

  • Grant Street

    Grant Street was named after Ulysses S. Grant, the Civil War hero and 18th President of the United States.

  • A Child’s Life on Grant Street: Memories of Camden

    It all begins in a little row house (they call them townhouses now) on Grant Street in Camden NJ. I remember my mother telling me once that she and my father paid $3,000 for that house somewhere around 1952, when they married. I slept in the same bed with my older sister Chris, who was…

  • Hale Street

    Hale Street

    Hale Street, which stretched from Central Avenue to Ferry Avenue in a north-south direction, was situated west of the present-day railroad tracks. Its presence in Camden City Directories dates back to 1895. Initially, four residences lined Hale Street, numbered 1701, 1703, 1705, and 1707. Sometime between 1913 and 1920, these houses underwent renumbering, becoming 1800,…

  • Charles H. Hatch

    Charles H. Hatch

    Charles Hollingshead Hatch was born in 1835, the son of George G. Hatch, who died in Portsmouth, Virginia in 1842, leaving Charles and his two siblings fatherless. His mother, Elizabeth Champion from Waterford Township, Gloucester County, turned to her family, the Champions, for support. The Champion family were farmers, and young Charles followed suit, working…

  • Basil P. Cook

    Basil P. Cook

    Basil Preston Cook was born in England. He entered the bar business during Prohibition and had several encounters with the law. By 1932, he was managing a bar at 939 South 5th Street. By 1942, Basil Cook was working as a salesman for the Camden County Beverage Corporation, which owned and operated the Camden Beer…

  • Alexander Peacock

    Alexander Peacock was one of the original members of the Camden Fire Department, joining as an extra man with Engine Company 1 on December 7, 1869. Before joining the fire department, he worked as a carpenter. In the fall of 1869, he lived at 1127 Broadway. Peacock was removed from the Camden Fire Department on…