Tag: Eavenson and Levering

The Eavenson & Levering plant at South 3rd & Jackson Streets, as viewed from the southwest.
Posted in Manufacturing and Hardware

Eavenson and Levering Company

Founded in 1902 by Alban Eavenson and J. Walter Levering in Philadelphia, the Eavenson & Levering plant scoured wool so it could be processed into yarn.

The Hurley Store on Broadway, a great big structure conducted on progressive lines as is proven by the manner in which the buying public bestows its patronage. The Hurley service has become a byword with thousands of South Jersey families. its occupants.
Posted in Businesses

CAMDEN INDUSTRIES

Various industries in Camden, circa 1929

Leather Stock Photo
Posted in Historical Accounts

INDUSTRIES QUICK TO APPRECIATE CAMDEN’S DESIRABILITIES

The first industry to enter our boundaries came into being when the Browning Brothers established a plant for the manufacture of dye-stuffs and at about the same time the American Nickel Works was started.

Ditch Stock Photo
Posted in Streets

Liney Ditch

Liney Ditch takes its name from Line Ditch, aka Little Newton Creek, a stream located in South Camden. This stream originated out near 10th Street at one time. It flowed under Broadway between Jackson and Lansdowne Street.

Bandit - Wanted Stock Photo
Posted in News Articles

Wirtz to Hear Fate in Bandit Quiz Today

Decision on any action to be taken against Stanley Wirtz, suspended Camden detective charged with having furnished the guns and automobile for a holdup, will be made today by Commissioner Mary W. Kobus and Police Chief Arthur Colsey.

Police Stock Photo
Posted in News Articles

Wirtz Ordered to Face Inquiry By Mrs. Kobus

Detective Stanley Wirtz, suspended by Police Chief Arthur Colsey yesterday pending investigation into charges that he supplied the guns and an automobile for a holdup, has been ordered to appear today before Commissioner Mary W. Kobus, director of public safety.

Just one hundred years ago today, a little group of men went before the Legislature and asked that body to incorporate as a city the straggling and struggling village of Camden. If these men could now visit the city born that day through their efforts, they might well feel that their labor of love was not in vain. For the village of 1,143 people in 1828 has become a great city of close to 200,000 today. By estimate of the United States Census Department, the population on July 1, 1927, was 133,100. This does not include the thickly populated interlocking suburbs, neither does it make allowance for the enormous influx of home-seekers who have followed Camden Bridge to the Jersey side of the Delaware since 1926.
Posted in News Articles

CAMDEN – A Great City Growing Greater

Just one hundred years ago today, a little group of men went before the Legislature and asked that body to incorporate as a city the straggling and struggling village of Camden. If these men could now visit the city born that day through their efforts, they might well feel that their labor of love was not in vain. For the village of 1,143 people in 1828 has become a great city of close to 200,000 today. By estimate of the United States Census Department, the population on July 1, 1927, was 133,100. This does not include the thickly populated interlocking suburbs, neither does it make allowance for the enormous influx of home-seekers who have followed Camden Bridge to the Jersey side of the Delaware since 1926.

Circuit Court Judge Frank T. Lloyd yesterday accepted chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee which is to study the unemployment question and make suggestions for remedial measures. With Judge Lloyd on the committee are: Alban Eavenson, of Eavenson & Levering; Belford G. Royal, of the Victor Talking Machine Company; Congressman Francis F. Patterson. Mayor Charles H. Ellis, former United States Senator David Baird, I. A Hawkes, of the Hunt Pen Company; Frank Vanhart, president of City Council, and an official of the Esterbrook Pen Company; John Prentice, director of the Board of Freeholders; Burleigh B. Draper, of the Broadway Trust Company. A. C Dorrance, of the Campbell Soup Company; Lawyer William S. Darnell, CW, Tomlinson, of the R. M. Hollinshed Company; James V. Moran, of the Hurley Company; Rev. Thomas J. Whelen pastor of the Church of the Holy Name; J. D. Johnson. of the State Employment Bureau: Rev Charles B. Dubell, director of St. John's P. E. Church; Elmer E. Long, of Munger & Long: Mrs. Dr. A. H. Lippincott, Mrs. W. Penn Corson and Mrs. Harry Pelouze.
Posted in News Articles

New Chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee

Circuit Court Judge Frank T. Lloyd yesterday accepted chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee which is to study the unemployment question and make suggestions for remedial measures. With Judge Lloyd on the committee are: Alban Eavenson, of Eavenson & Levering; Belford G. Royal, of the Victor Talking Machine Company; Corgressman Francis F. Patterson. Mayor Charles H. Ellis, former United States Senator David Baird, I. A Hawkes, of the Hunt Pen Company; Frank Vanhart, president of City Council, and an official of the Esterbrook Pen Company; John Prentice, director of the Board of Freeholders; Burleigh B. Draper, of the Broadway Trust Company. A. C Dorrance, of the Campbell Soup Company; Lawyer William S. Darnell, CW, Tomlinson, of the R. M. Hollingshed Company; James V. Moran, of the Hurley Company; Rev. Thomas J. Whelen pastor of the Church of the Holy Name; J. D. Johnson. of the State Employment Bureau: Rev Charles B. Dubell, director of St. John’s P. BE. Church; Eimer E. Long, of Munger & Long: Mrs. Dr. A. H. Lippincott, Mrs. W. Penn Carson and Mrs. Harry Pelouze.