H. Pinsky & Son Co.

H. Pinsky and Son Co, February 1928

Broadway at Spruce Street, Camden, NJ

Harry Pinsky came to the United States from Russia in the late 1880s. He opened up a furniture store in Camden in 1891, which his son Reuben became head of in 1906. The business was located at 1128 Broadway when the 1914 City Directory was compiled.

Business was good after World War I. In 1923 the Pinsky’s purchased Wildey Hall, at the corner of South 6th and Pine Streets, and converted it into warehouse space.

In 1924, the new Pinsky Store building, a five story structure at 836-840 Broadway, the corner of Broadway & Spruce Street, opened for business. The Pinsky building was later acquired by a furniture business called Whitehill, which operated there through the late 1940s. By 1936 the Pinsky Store moved to 921 Broadway. This building was later acquired by Joseph DiMona Sr. a few years later. The Pinsky Store moved once again, to 941 Broadway. The business had closed by 1950.

On June 1, 1950 the former Pinsky Store reopened as the thirteenth store in the Stern department store chain, founded in 1897 by Louis Stern, Leon Levy, and Louis Schneider. The Stern Store remained at 836-840 Broadway into the 1960s.

Another Pinsky, Ralph M., also operated a furniture store in Camden, at 1222 Broadway. This business operated in Camden until at least 1977.


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