Alfred Cramer Elementary School


2800 Mickle Street, Camden, NJ

In 1913, the Eastside Elementary School was built in the 2800 block of Mickle Street during the administration of Mayor Charles H. Ellis. At this time, Camden’s longtime Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James E. Bryan, oversaw the construction of many new schools in Camden.

As East Camden’s population grew and more children stayed in school rather than entering the workforce early, the building transitioned into a junior high and was renamed Alfred Cramer Junior High School. This renaming honored Alfred Cramer, an innovative real estate developer who enabled working-class people to buy building lots through installment payments. He was responsible for much of the development in East Camden and Cramer Hill, which also bears his name. As a junior high school, Cramer served most children attending public schools in East Camden.

In 1930, Woodrow Wilson Junior High School opened on Federal Street, and Cramer was converted back into an elementary school. In June 1933, Dr. Leon N. Neulen, then Camden’s superintendent of schools, announced that Woodrow Wilson would become a high school and Cramer would revert to a junior high school. This change was implemented in September 1933.

Around 1957, Cramer once again became an elementary school. Since then, Cramer has undergone many renovations and changes. Today, it is a Pre-K to Grade 4 elementary school, offering full-day pre-kindergarten and kindergarten programs that emphasize language development, positive self-image, and early reading activities.

Additionally, Cramer School has served the local community for many years as a polling place during elections.


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