Tag: Camden Home for Friendless Children

  • Carol Sampson Feaster – Oral History

    Carol Sampson Feaster – Oral History

    Q – Were you baptized and if so, in what religion? A – Protestant. It was a Presbyterian church. I was baptized in this church because I remember being dipped in the water. [First Presbyterian Church – Ed.] Q- So you were older? A – Yea, I was about 9 years old, that I remember…

  • The Sampson Family Oral Interviews

    The Sampson Family Oral Interviews

    With Herbert A. Sampson & Carol Sampson Feaster Herbert A. Sampson and Caroline Suzanne Sampson were born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to William Allen Sampson (1860-1937) and Helen Ida Petty (1887-1931). Helen, a native of Newfoundland, immigrated to Massachusetts in the mid-1910s, while William hailed from Boston. In approximately 1924, the family, including older sister Lillian…

  • Bellevue Hospital – Tracking History

    Bellevue Hospital – Tracking History

    By Thomas A. Bergbauer, Retired Courier-Post Editor A few times in the past two months I have received several phone calls from readers asking if a hospital ever existed in North Camden next to the Ben Franklin Bridge and if so, what was its name. The answer of course is, yes! The name of the…

  • A Brief History of the Camden Home for Children & SPCC

    A Brief History of the Camden Home for Children & SPCC

    In Service to Youth The Camden Home for Friendless Children, situated on Haddon Avenue above Mount Vernon, stands as an emblem of compassionate care for destitute and friendless children. Its inception, formalized through a charter granted by the State Legislature on April 6, 1865, brought together individuals committed to a noble cause. The charter incorporated…

  • Camden Home for Friendless Children

    Camden Home for Friendless Children

    Established in 1865, The Camden Home for Friendless Children found its roots at 915 Haddon Avenue in Camden, NJ, by the 1890s. Mrs. Lucretia Read, widow of prominent Camden realtor William T. Read Sr. and mother of New Jersey State Senator William T. Read Jr., played a vital role in the institution. Actively engaged in…

  • Children at Camden Home Have Big Time in Wading Pool

    Children at Camden Home Have Big Time in Wading Pool

    Camden Courier-Post – June 30, 1933 Bathing Place, Given by Citizens Officially Opened Four Youthful Charges, Left Motherless, to Return to Father Bathing in the backyard is a privilege of the children of the Camden Home for Friendless Children that is enjoyed by few of the other youngsters in the city. Yesterday, 63 of the…

  • Pyne Poynt Plans All-Day 4th Party

    Pyne Poynt Plans All-Day 4th Party

    Camden Courier-Post – June 2, 1933 Program to Have ‘Something’ on Continuously, Day and Night Plans for the thirty-third anniversary of the Pyne Poynt Athletic Association to be observed with an all ­day program at Pyne Poynt Park July 4 were discussed last night at a meeting in the Pyne Poynt Social Club, 929 North…

  • Removed to Hospitals

    Camden Courier-Post – January 9, 1922 The police ambulance removed the following residents of South Camden to the hospitals late on Saturday afternoon: West Jersey Homeopathic– William Perry, aged 62 years, 1725 Fillmore Street; Albert Biron, 24 years old, 1108 Baring Street. Cooper Hospital– Mrs. Edna Rosenfelt, aged 23 years, 575 Washington Street; Margaret Radcliffe…

  • Camden Looks After Friendless Children

    Camden Looks After Friendless Children

    Philadelphia Inquirer – January 4, 1897 Santa Visits Them Despite War, Many Churches Hold Christmas Services Camden’s generous spirited citizens have responded to the appeal that was made by the Camden Home for Friendless Children, whose youthful inmates were threatened with having a very lean sort of a visit from Santa Claus. There were so…

  • Camden Home for Friendless Children Fund

    Camden Home for Friendless Children Fund

    Camden Democrat – July 18,1874 The Camden Home for Friendless Children—The committee on collections for the Building Fund, have great pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of the following contributions: Wm. Groves, $50; sundries, by Wm. Curtiss, $20.15; Adams Express Co. by Thomas Fitzgerald, $20; B. F. Davis, $10; F. Bourquin, $10; Thos Fitzgerald, $5; Rufus…