Tag: New York Shipbuilding Company

  • Reminiscing at 582 Auburn Street

    I was born in Parkside in 1933, and lived there until 1944. I was 11 years old, when our rented house at 1039 Princess Ave., and hundreds of others citywide, were sold to accommodate the workers who poured into Camden for war-related jobs at the N.Y. Ship Yard, RCA, and other defense-connected companies. My parents…

  • Arlington Street

    Arlington Street

    Arlington Street in Camden, New Jersey, emerged as a microcosm of the city’s industrial history, reflecting the ebbs and flows of economic prosperity, community resilience, and urban transformation. The street’s origins date back to the late 19th century when Camden experienced rapid industrialization, attracting workers seeking employment in its bustling factories and shipyards. The neighborhood…

  • Knox Gelatine Company

    Knox Gelatine Company

    Knox Gelatin Co., originally known as the Landesman Co., had its beginnings in early 20th-century Camden, specifically at the intersection of 4th and Erie streets. This company specialized in producing gelatin for various industries, including food, photography, and pharmaceuticals. The pivotal moment came when Maurice Kind, a German-born brewer who immigrated to the United States…

  • Fairview – Tracking History

    Fairview – Tracking History

    By Thomas A. Bergbauer, Retired Courier-Post Editor The Fairview section of Camden was the mother of all planned communities. It was born at the beginning of the “war to end all wars.” In 1917, when the United States entered World War I, the New York Shipbuilding Corp. on Broadway, owned by the American International Corp.…

  • City Industry – Tracking History

    City Industry – Tracking History

    By Thomas A. Bergbauer, Retired Courier-Post Editor Just 100 years ago Camden was a thriving, prosperous industrial metropolis and the future looked bright for this river city. At the end of the 19th century and in the first couple decades of the 20th century, industry in Camden came alive and at that time most of…

  • Richard R. C. Donnelly

    Richard Roscoe Compton Donnelly Sr. was born on September 14, 1890, to Roscoe C. Donnelly and Ella. The Donnelly family had a long history in Cumberland County, dating back to the 1870s. Roscoe Donnelly worked as a glassblower, and in the 1890s, he moved with his wife and sons, Richard and Adolph, to Cicero in…

  • Morgan Street

    Morgan Street

    Morgan Street is often mistaken for Morgan Boulevard, as they intersect each other. Morgan Street has also partially been renamed as Holtec Boulevard. Morgan Street stretches from Broadway, across from the former New York Shipbuilding Corporation shipyard, all the way to South 10th Street. It passes over the Pennsylvania Railroad (now Conrail) railroad tracks, South…

  • John Reilly

    John Reilly

    John Reilly, born on July 12, 1890, in Gloucester City, New Jersey, was the second of three children to Joseph J. Reilly and his wife. Sadly, his mother passed away in the mid-1890s, and Joseph J. Reilly remarried around 1897, having two more children. In 1900, the Reilly family resided at 915 Carpenter Street, where…

  • Jackie Hindle

    Jackie Hindle

    John A.” Jackie” Hindle was born on April 26, 1901, in England to Robert and Edith Hindle. In 1909, the Hindle family, which included Jackie’s younger brother Theodore, emigrated to the United States and settled in Camden, New Jersey, in 1919. They rented a home at 816 Tulip Street. Jackie’s father, Robert, worked as a…

  • Fairview

    Fairview

    Fairview is the area of Camden also known as Yorkship Village, which was built to house the workers of the New York Shipbuilding Company.

  • INDUSTRIES QUICK TO APPRECIATE CAMDEN’S DESIRABILITIES

    INDUSTRIES QUICK TO APPRECIATE CAMDEN’S DESIRABILITIES

    City’s Workshops turn out everything from pen points to the Superdreadnaught Battleships A seer once stated that Camden allegedly was a city of possibilities. And then industries started to crop up within the boundaries of the City. The first industry to enter our boundaries came into being when the Browning Brothers established a plant for…

  • BROWN-BOVERI TURNS OUT SHIPS FOR PEACE AND WAR TIMES

    Electrical Equipment for Mightiest Power Plants Combined with Ship Construction at Big Camden Industrial Plant. Camden for many years has been a center for the building of ships. There are yards which construct costly yachts and little fishing dories and others which build scows and tugs and everything up to the mightiest battleships. The most…

  • Vincent Ariel Tydeman

    Vincent Ariel Tydeman

    VINCENT ARIEL TYDEMAN was born in New Jersey on August 24, 1883 to Edmund and Sarah Tydeman, who had come to America from England in 1878 with their nine children. Another child, Florence, was born just before the June 1880 census. Edmund Tydeman, the oldest son of a Baptist minister, was an optician who had…

  • Woman’s Scream Routs Robber

    Woman’s Scream Routs Robber

    The Evening Bulletin, Philadelphia, P.A. – September 25, 1944 Children in Camden Join Outcry after Hand on Throat Awakens Her A woman’s screams and the outcries of her two frightened children drove off a robber choking her in bed early Thursday morning. A hand around her neck awakened Mrs. Anna Fino, 38, of 411 Stevens…

  • Hats ‘Boss’ Kobus Wears, Much Like Queen Mary’s

    Hats ‘Boss’ Kobus Wears, Much Like Queen Mary’s

    Camden Courier-Post – September 17, 1941 The political boss of Camden is a motherly, gray-haired woman who wears hats like those effected by Queen Mary of England. Nevertheless, and in spite of the fact that she denies it vehemently, Mrs. Mary W. Kobus, Camden’s Director of Public Safety and president of its Board of Education,…