Herbert Anderson

Herbert Anderson - 1930-12-15

Herbert Anderson was born in New Jersey in 1891 to George W. Anderson and his wife Lizzie Anderson, one of at least four children. His father served as a member of the Camden Police Department from the 1890s through at least 1916. In 1900 the family then lived at 711 Carman Street, in what was then Camden’s 9th Ward. Besides Herbert the family included brothers Harry and Russell, and a sister, Nellie.

He married Florence L. Walls at the age of 17. His father-in-law, George Walls, was a sailing ship captain. A son, George, was born in 1909, daughter Anna came two years later. When the census was taken in 1910, Herbert Anderson and family were living at 304 Vine Street in North Camden, the home of Captain and Mrs. Walls. He was then working as a “wiper” in an “engine house,” which roughly translates that he was working somewhere around steam engines and boilers as an unskilled laborer.

Herbert Anderson was a member of the New Jersey National Guard when America became involved in World War I, and served with the United States Army when the guard was mobilized. He was working as a member of the Camden Police Department, however, in May of 1918. At the time of the 1920 Census, the Anderson family resided at 534 South 8th Street.

In April of 1930, when the census was again taken, Herbert Anderson was a sergeant on the Camden Police Department. He was promoted to Lieutenant shortly thereafter, and served in that capacity until his death in November of 1939. The family lived at 496 Newton Avenue, across the street from Clara Burrough Jr. High School. During this period he served as Chief Clerk of the Police Department.

Well liked and respected by all, journalist Dan McConnell wrote of him in the November 7, 1939 edition of the Camden Courier-Post:

Sympathy: To the loved ones of Police Lieutenant Anderson we extend heartfelt sympathy… Herb was a gentleman and a fine officer who was liked by every man in his department. So few of us could hope to be so esteemed and respected, newspapermen lost a real friend.

Herbert Anderson was survived by his wife and children. His wife was still living at the Newton Avenue address as late as 1947.

Herbert Anderson’s son George married Mary Ferat, daughter of former professional basketball star Eddie Ferat in October of 1935.


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