36th Street

Battling Spread of mosquito-borne St. Louis encephalitis firemen burning swamp lands at the foot of 36th st. yesterday hold the attention of Camden Deputy Fire Chief Godfrey Paterson (pointing) and Fire Marshal George Baxter. Camden Courier-Post, 1964

Thirty-Sixth Street extends from the Delaware River south, crossing River Road to Federal Street. Following the standard convention for numbered streets in Camden, it is North 36th Street above Federal, and South 36th Street below Federal.

North 36th Street serves as Camden’s northern border with Pennsauken Township at various points along its length, leading to some inconsistency in street numbering on the north side of North 36th Street. This arises because Pennsauken utilizes a four-digit street numbering system, which differs from Camden’s street numbering system. Thirty-Sixth Street became a part of Camden when Stockton Township merged with Camden in 1899. The street had been laid out many years earlier and was referred to as Cove Avenue in Pennsauken until the 1890s.


Location






Related Photos


Related Articles

  • 36th Street

    36th Street

    Thirty-Sixth Street extends from the Delaware River south, crossing River Road to Federal Street. Following the standard convention for numbered streets in Camden, it is North 36th Street above Federal, and South 36th Street below Federal. North 36th Street serves as Camden’s northern border with Pennsauken Township at various points along its length, leading to…

    Read More…

  • Federal Street

    Federal Street

    Federal Street was originally called Joseph Cooper’s Lane, and ran from the river to the old Haddonfield Road. In 1803 Joshua Cooper, who was an ardent Federalist, called it Federal Street. His father, Daniel Cooper, had, in 1764, built a large three-story brick house and established a ferry about the same time to Philadelphia. This…

    Read More…

  • Growing up in Cramer Hill

    Ted Frett grew up in Cramer Hill at North 29th Street and Tyler Avenue, and shared his memories of growing up in Cramer Hill in the 1940s and 1950s.

    Read More…


Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.